sickpage:

Gustav JohanssonLaundry in Trapani, 2012

sickpage:

Gustav Johansson
Laundry in Trapani, 2012

Jared Fowler - Ile Du Nord, 2013

kitty-me-ow:

i-eviscerate:

A memorial was being held for a young girl who passed away five years ago. During the service, a wild doe walked up and did this. 

Reincarnation

kitty-me-ow:

i-eviscerate:

A memorial was being held for a young girl who passed away five years ago. During the service, a wild doe walked up and did this. 

Reincarnation

vincisomething:

What if you and your icon switched voices for an entire week.

thepinupcreature:

Please consider emailing Time magazine at feedback@time.com to get them to reconsider not putting Laverne Cox on their list. She overwhelmingly got voted in at 91.5%, but was not put on there. Meanwhile, Carrie Underwood had 25% of the vote and was put on there.
The erasure of trans women, and women of color needs to stop. Ms. Cox does nothing but good work.

I’m not going to dig deep into the bullshit shenanigans of TIME magazine but how embarrassing and corrupt it is is so terribly obvious that I can’t understand why anyone bothers defending it.

Just comparing some of the blurbs is like a slap in the face.

From the Artist section, Benedict Cumberbatch and Kerry Washington.

The alarmingly talented English star

When I was about 25 years old, I worked with two very good actors. The encounters were brief, but I’ve remembered them both with great admiration. Wanda Ventham and Timothy Carlton both embodied qualities which one is fogyishly tempted to look at with nostalgia. Along with very considerable talent, they had elegance, glamor, wit, kindness and decency.

I didn’t know at the time that they were married or that they had a son of about 10 who was quietly gestating all the same attributes. And now, 30 years later, the boy has been let loose. He has taken the form of Benedict Cumberbatch.

His parents’ qualities are on rampant display. It’s rare to the point of outlandish to find so many variables in one actor, including features which ought to be incompatible: vulnerability, a sense of danger, a clear intellect, honesty, courage — and a rather alarming energy. I take no pleasure in feeling humbled, but there’s no getting around it.

He must be stopped.

In comparison to

The actor who projects strength amid scandal

Occasionally in American pop culture, an icon emerges who captivates us and provides a vivid snapshot of who we are and the changing times in which we live. In her role as Olivia Pope, Scandal’s unflappable political fixer, Kerry Washington has used her grace and vibrant magnetism to transcend age, race and gender, and to provide a new mainstream media lens through which to view modern womanhood and professional excellence.

Setting aside the “scandalous” melodrama necessary to sustain a fictional series so titled, Kerry has offered up a fresh new archetype for what it means to lead while combining courage and compassion, strength and vulnerability, passion, steely discipline and unfailing loyalty. It is a role that makes full use of her distinctive talent for drawing in audiences with such authenticity that we often forget she is acting.

Kerry’s work with the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities since 2009 is also a source of deep inspiration, using arts education to close achievement gaps and ignite passion among young people.

In a world that too often tells little girls to choose between womanhood and success, between femininity and a seat at the head of the table, both onscreen and off Kerry Washington embodies the promise that lives in all our young people to shape their own destinies and succeed as “gladiators” for the causes in which they believe.

I suppose in fairness I’ve never heard of Kerry Washington, which poses questions of its own. Why haven’t I? Regardless, in Benedict’s article they say he’s honest and courageous without backing up said statements and then in Kerry’s article the author provides an elucidation as to why she’s influential opposed to being simply a good actor. And I’m no judge of acting, I have enjoyed Benedict’s performance on screen but I have no rants or raves sparked because of them. However, I do know that many of his roles have been mundane, two-dimensional and predictable (not his fault, the writers are disappointing us here) while Olivia Pope is apparently the opposite.

The whole thing is ridiculous and the fact that Laverne Cox wasn’t included in this list is eye roll worthy at least.

Looking through the list and reading some of these descriptions makes me question how many these writers are genuinely concerned with what they are publishing. Many of the articles seem so lazy, juvenile, and dumbed down that I can’t take them seriously. Basically, Time magazine is hardly credible and intelligent and shouldn’t be a trusted source of information and review let alone a mouthpiece to declare the world’s 100 most influential people.

And now it’s done for me.

queerwatson:

 yeah no

i kept looking and looking and looking and they left laverne cox off the fucking list

you can go check but she’s not there

fuck time magazine

that’s bullshit

englishsnow:

 planetails ✈ || Tokyo nights

lars134:

"Rope" (1948)

lars134:

"Rope" (1948)